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    We are committed to being the place people want to be – where patients want to get their care, faculty want to work, residents want to train and medical students want to learn.

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    The Department of Surgery specialties include general surgery, surgical oncology, transplantation, bariatric surgery, trauma, critical care, burns, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, urology, podiatric and vascular surgery.

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    A primary focus of our department is the education of future physicians and training of surgeons.

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    Our graduating residents are competitive for the most highly regarded fellowships or fully prepared for practice.

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    Treating Type 1 Diabetes with Innovative Tissue Engineering Approaches for Cell Therapy without immunosuppression.

With more than 52 faculty members, the University of Arizona Department of Surgery is one of the largest multi-specialty surgical groups in the state. Our surgeons provide excellent patient-centered care, engage in cutting edge research and mentor the next generation of surgeons and physicians.

Department News

UA Health Sciences Researchers Outline When Play Becomes Harmful: Pokémon Go and the Potential for Increased Accidents

Get out and play is a call often heard to increase physical activity and optimize health, but in one the first articles published in a peer-reviewed medical journal, UA Health Sciences researchers discuss how augmented reality games can lead to acute treatment in a trauma center.

3-D Printing and Patient Care: UA Surgeon Shares How the Technology can Saves Lives and Money in The Lancet

Using 3-D models for surgery planning before complex procedures and as a potential means to replicate surgical tools in low-resource areas, Dr. David Armstrong and his lab share with The Lancet, a prestigious UK medical journal, their vision of 3-D printing technology in medicine.

Precision Medicine Has Applications for Pancreatic Cancer

Cancers with a particularly poor prognosis pose a major challenge to health care in the 21st century. New research shows that a highly personalized, patient-directed approach is necessary to improve treatment outcomes.